Terry Kaldhusdal

Consider the Conversation 2: Stories about Cure, Relief, and Comfort is Terry Kaldhusdal’s sixth documentary film. His previous work includes Thinking Like a Historian, for the Wisconsin State Historical Society, and America’s Kings and Queens, The Gilded Age in Middle America, winner of the Wisconsin Historical Society's 2010 Public Programs Award.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has written that Kaldhusdal’s work is “clear and concise” and added that he has a “passion for learning and a talent for communicating.” Columnist Laurel Walker has called his work “A-plus” and stated that he has “a knack for documenting history.”

In 1991, Terry joined his wife as a classroom teacher and moved from Southern California to Wisconsin. He currently teaches sixth grade at Kettle Moraine Middle School in Dousman. His students have created documentaries that include the history of the Kettle Moraine School District and personal digital stories on everything from responsibility to the three branches of government. In 2009, one of Terry’s students was featured at the AHA Film Festival in Southern Illinois.

Terry has traveled across his state and across the country as a speaker to improve our educational system. He was honored in 2006 with the Kohl Fellowship Award, in 2007 as Wisconsin's State Teacher of the Year, and in 2011 as Wisconsin's History Teacher of the Year. Terry resides in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin with his wife, Janet, and their three children.

Film:

  • 2006 - The General of Progression: The Story of John S. Rockwell
  • 2007  - Prestige and Prominence: 100 Years of the Milwaukee Auto Show
  • 2007 - Thinking Like a Historian: Rethinking History Instruction
  • 2008 - America’s Kings and Queens: The Gilded Age in Middle America
  • 2011 - Consider the Conversation: A Documentary on a Taboo Subject
  • 2014 - Consider the Conversation 2: Stories about Cure, Relief, and Comfort

Book:

  • 2008 - The Composition Jam Box: A Complete Guide to 21st Century Multimedia Projects (co-authored with Alan Sitomer and Joseph Fatheree)

Website:

  • Mysteries of Aztalan: A Historical Look at a Lost Civilization